News

18
Jan

Innovation Framework Workshop @ FEI 2013

It is my pleasure to have accepted an invitation to again deliver the pre-conference all-day workshop Innovation Frameworks - "The primer to end all primers!" at the FEI 2013 event in Boston, May 6-8. For those who are not initiated, this workshop is whistle-stop tour around all aspects of the Front End of Innovation, covering Doing Innovation - everything from insightful needs discovery to better ideation to technology development to creating a winning concept. Managing Innovation - everything from strategic linking to successful organizations to innovator profiles and building better teams to the ever-elusive (we'll try to show you how to make it not so) culture. a.k.a. "drinking from a firehose"! If you're thinking of attending, please Contact me for my personal affiliate's discount code. I hope to see you there!

11
Jan

ENET presentation on Slideshare

I was honored to be asked to speak on this panel alongside Bill Star, a funding guru and president of VenCorps and Jeffrey Peden, serial entrepreneur and founder of Cravelabs. The central theme of my talk on the panel was Really great mega-companies have spent millions of dollars figuring out best practice for innovation, prototyping and product development. Use their investment to your advantage Don't try to emulate them - you have neither the time nor the money to do so However, learn the why and wherefore of their practices and extract and use the essence You will get to a better product if you do  

11
Dec

January 8, 2013. Waltham, MA. Join us for a fascinating and instructive evening as we join a set of co-presenters and share insights on how start-ups can tackle product prototyping and development. Click here for details: Product Development and Prototype Strategies in a Startup | ENET | IEEE Boston Entrepreneurs' Network.

17
Jan

Innovation Framework workshop at FEI 2012 announced

Geoff Waite has been invited to return to the FEI conference to deliver the Day One Innovation workshop in Orlando in May.  Having delivered "pre-conference" workshops for several years, it's a pleasure to be back after a leave of absence in 2011. If you're interested in attending this year's event, please feel free to contact me for my personal discount code. The original workshop in 2006 was a half day session aimed at providing a 'primer' for those new to the management discipline of innovation.  The most consistent feedback was "please make it longer than a half day".  In the years since the workshop has morphed year on year as we've found the field of innovation maturing and the role of the conference changing, providing more of a framework than a primer, accessible and valuable for both the experienced and the novel innovation manager.  Along the way, we've delivered full day, day and a half and two day workshops and the feedback is always the same:  "make it longer".  The key take-away:  no matter how much ...

05
Dec

Clumpy Networks and Innovation

The growth of the web and the networks that build upon it have allowed us to significantly extend our ability to examine social networks, how they function and the roles of individuals within them. A number of researchers have reached further to ask the question "How do networks relate to innovation?"  "Are all networks created equal, or do some promote certain types of innovation?" Steve Borgatti at Boston College has focused on asking how networks influence management science and has published a short essay in which he concludes: "radical innovation is facilitated by sparser and clumpier networks" Sponsored by Sandia, a paper published by Mote, Hage, Jordan entitled: "Networks, Organizations and Innovation: A General Theory and Research Program" proposes the model shown at left Out of this is born the notion that Clumpy Networks are critical to driving and delivering breakthrough innovation in companies. Equally importantly, however, we can see that clumpy networks are not good for incremental innovation where dense networks are required. This is an interesting example of the need to recognize that incremental and radical innovation come about differently, rely on different resources and need ...